My Year To Thrive

"My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style." ~Maya Angelou


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I Refuse To Put Your Teen On A Diet | Melanie R. Silverman MS, RD, IBCLC

You must understand and accept that he or she may never be at a weight that you think is right.
~Melanie R. Silverman MS, RD, IBCLC

source: Kwik Med

I Refuse To Put Your Teen On A Diet | Melanie R. Silverman MS, RD, IBCLC

I found this great letter on HuffPo via Aaron Flores’ fb page.  It’s a letter from a nutritionist to her clients who want their kids put on restrictive diets so they can be thin.  Instead of diets she encourages intuitive eating & helping their child develop a healthy relationship with food.

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Who Knew Glass Jars Could Be Good for Your Health?

“Vegetables are a must on a diet. I suggest carrot cake, zucchini bread, and pumpkin pie.”
~Jim Davis (Good Reads)

DSCN3695

I’ve been saving glass jars for months now, & now I know why!  I got an email today about Clean Eating Spinach Salad in Jars & it clicked why I need all those jars.  (Actually I have used some for various purposes, fyi.)  I’ve seen the idea before, but at the time I didn’t have jars & by the time I had jars I forgot about it.   I also have some ideas for overnight oatmeal in jars pinned, which I’m going to try out now that I have half a pantry shelf full of empty jars.

For your own ideas, here are a couple of links to inspire you:

How to Pack the Perfect Salad in a Jar
19 Ridiculously Easy Mugs of Overnight Oats

Given the tangent I went on behind this jump, I almost retitled this Trying to Eat Healthy When You’re Broke & Hate to Cook. Continue reading


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Yale University Thinks I Have an Eating Disorder | Frances Chan

(source)

Yale University Thinks I Have an Eating Disorder | Frances Chan

“…because the University blindly uses BMI as the primary means of diagnosis, it remains oblivious to students who truly need help but do not have low enough BMIs. Instead, it subjects students who have a personal and family history of low weight to treatment that harms our mental health. By forcing standards upon us that we cannot meet, the University plays the same role as fashion magazines and swimsuit calendars that teach us about the ‘correct shape’ of the human body.”

HAES.  It’s not just for fat people.

A Facebook friend posted the Gawker article about this HuffPo blog post today.  It took a lot of clicking to get this. I hope you appreciate it! 😛  Someone very thin who was forced into medical intervention based on her BMI.   I found the part about becoming so stressed out about food she came to resent meals & losing her appetite.  It’s the sister problem to finding yourself more obsessed with food when trying to cut back for weight loss.

I had a long day yesterday & the evening blew up in an emergency so I missed my first day of posting this month. 😦  Going to try to get a few posts like this in the queue to give myself a cushion & time to work on something a bit more substantial.

Enjoy!


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A Trip to the Local Library

A truly good book teaches me better than to read it. I must soon lay it down, and commence living on its hint. What I began by reading, I must finish by acting.
~Henry David Thoreau (Brainy Quotes)

library books

No water mark or photo editing for this pic because I haven’t set my NEW LAPTOP up for it yet.  I  broke the screen on my other laptop months ago, so I was using it with a monitor. *le sigh*  I finally broke down & replaced it.

I went to the library today to finally get the last book in the Percy Jackson series (love the books, love the 2nd movie, disappointed by the 1st movie – in case you were wondering).  I also wanted to get a book on strength training while I was there.  I’ve been hearing a lot about The New Rules of Lifting for Women: Lift Like a Man, Look Like a Goddess but no such luck.  The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Weight Training (printed in 2000) was the best I could do.  Should be alright for the basics though.

An Unquiet Mind: Memoir of Moods & Madness was on a nearby shelf, as was Body Clutter: Love Your Body, Love Yourself.  I have quoted Kay Redfield Jamison here before, but never read the book – until now!  I had never heard of Body Clutter, but I am familiar with Flylady.  I grabbed the book based on the tag line & this from the back cover,

“…it’s not about finding the perfect diet, it’s about the way you feel about food & your body & understanding sound nutrition.”

I can get behind that.  I have been eating like the old me this month & I feel like crap because of it, so it appealed to me on that level.  Plus, I’m interested to see how it lines up with HAES principles.  It sounds like it could go either way.  I will let you know how it goes.

Have any of your read any of these books?  Have others you would recommend?  I would love to hear some opinions.


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NIH study shows people with serious mental illnesses can lose weight, March 21, 2013 News Release – National Institutes of Health (NIH)

The Frogman: Emergency Blog Kitten

Since the article has no images, it seemed like a good time to break out the emergency blog kitten.
(source: The Frogman)

NIH study shows people with serious mental illnesses can lose weight, March 21, 2013 News Release – National Institutes of Health (NIH)

People with serious mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression can lose weight and keep it off through a modified lifestyle intervention program, a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded study reported online today in The New England Journal of Medicine.

This is one of those studies I read that made my head a’splode.  Not because I don’t agree with the mentally ill losing weight, you know I certainly support healthy behaviors regardless of a weight loss goal, but because it is one of those studies where they draw their conclusions based on things that will never work in the real world.

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Can Fish Oil Help Your Brain – and Bipolar Disorder? | World of Psychology

 

Psych Central Can Fish Oil Help Your Brain – and Bipolar Disorder?

Can Fish Oil Help Your Brain – and Bipolar Disorder? | World of Psychology

The people of Japan experience one of the lowest bipolar disorder rates in the civilized world. Compared to the 4.4 percent lifetime prevalence rate of bipolar disorder in the U.S., in Japan it’s just 0.07 percent. That’s no typo — that’s a crazy large difference.

So what gives? How come the Japanese have such a low rate of bipolar disorder compared with other high-income, developed nations?

In a word: fish.

There is a good, solid set of research studies that examine the link between brain health and Omega-3 fatty acids. While these studies can, by and large, only speak to the correlation between these two things, findings from these studies are pretty stable — and growing

Two things come to mind while reading this:

  1. Japan has natural lithium springs.  Studies have shown people in those areas are happier & less stressed, the suicide rates are lower.  The question has been asked what if we put lithium in the water here?  IMHO, bad idea.  Not least of all because it should be everyone’s choice if they want those chemicals or not, & lithium can build up in your system & damage your liver.  Sure it would be a very minute dose if they put it in the water, but what if someone was already on lithium? Or a contraindicated med?  Or just had an allergy?
  2. How much does Japan’s attitudes toward mental illness play into that difference?  It’s possible Japan’s cases of Bipolar Disorder are underreported & mostly undiagnosed.  On the flip side, I believe it’s likely BD is over-diagnosed here.   Here is a 3yo article about a documentary on mental illness in Japan that shines a little more light on the subject.  It doesn’t specifically mention BD, but it seems they may use different diagnoses (the director of the movie had been diagnosed with “burn out”).  It also states nearly a quarter of people in Japan had experienced a mental health problem & they have a higher rate of suicides than in the US or the UK.

I have taken a fish, flax-seed, & borage oil supplement for several years.  I can’t honestly say if it has made a difference or not.  During that time I’ve also gone back on meds & into therapy (twice), moved back in with my dad in a hillbilly hell hole, & tried to kill myself.  Would things have been worse if I wasn’t on it?  Who knows.  I do know they say it’s good for you for a variety of reasons & my last physical says I’m pretty healthy.  I certainly don’t feel worse for taking it.

Anyone else have any input on fish oil or mental health in Japan?

Read the full article here.

 


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Can Food Be Addictive? | NYTimes.com

~Tomorrow is race day!~

ice cream crack pipe NYTimes

Can Food Be Addictive? – NYTimes.com

I absolutely believe food can be addictive.  I’ve gotten a lot better since I’ve been running, but I used to (& okay, sometimes still do) used food like an alcoholic would drink.  If I was sad or had a bad day, I ate.  If I was happy & had a good day I ate to celebrate.  The binges were always for sadness, loneliness, nervousness, the bad days.  I would eat till I was sick, & keep eating.  I ate things I knew were horrible for me.  Sometimes I would actually think to myself, “I wish I could eat till I exploded.  I want to eat myself to death.”  Regular exercise helps your body regulate sugar & I think that’s why the running helps so much with my eating, along with just generally making me feel better so I don’t need to eat that way as much.  I have far less cravings & binges.

Part of this uses a rat research finding I’ve blogged about before, but they’ve pulled in a few other articles.  A big take-home point for me is how deprivation affects us, which is how traditional dieting works.

…sugar-binging rats show signs of opiatelike withdrawal when their sugar is taken away — including chattering teeth, tremoring forepaws and the shakes. When the rats were allowed to resume eating sugar two weeks later, they pressed the food lever so frantically that they consumed 23 percent more than before.

I would say in my own experience that’s true.  One thing that really made sense for me, which is the opposite of the usual thinking, is from When Women Stop Hating Their Bodies.  They suggest that instead of restricting your access to the foods you crave, your trigger foods, you give yourself a plentiful supply.  Think about how much you could possibly eat at once & keep three times that much around at all times.  When you get over the initial spree of having it around all the time, it becomes mundane & loses its power.  It worked very well for me when I was able to do it.